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WHERE ARE YOU TEACHING?

Teaching remotely

Art on a cart

Teaching in a classroom

Teaching at home or in a studio

 

TEACHING REMOTELY

Taking your art lessons online is new and uncharted territory for many of you. And let’s face it, it’s scary!

Let’s make it a little less frightening. 🙂

MY STUDENTS DON’T HAVE ART SUPPLIES AT HOME. WHAT CAN I DO?

While most of The KinderArt Club lesson plans make use of materials that most people can access (ie: crayons, black Sharpie markers, watercolor paints, etc.) there are some which use tempera or poster paints. If students are unable to find these materials at home, they can be instructed to use what they have on hand. A painting lesson can be just as effective when created with markers or crayons. Sometimes, this might mean that the paper should be cut in half since coloring with markers can take a longer time than covering large areas with paint.

CAN I USE KINDERART CLUB MATERIALS IN MY GOOGLE CLASSROOM OR SCHOOL LMS (Learning Management System)?

If your classroom or LMS is password protected, meaning only staff and students/parents have access, then yes, you may post KinderArt Club materials (worksheets, video links, samples, etc.). However, if your school’s website is public, then reposting KinderArt Club materials is a violation of the terms and conditions of the club and will not be permitted.

CAN I SHARE KINDERART CLUB MATERIALS VIA ZOOM?

You can log into your KinderArt Club account while on a Zoom call with your students. Then, you can share your screen. This way your students will be able to see the material as you discuss it.

Here’s how to share your screen on Zoom:

https://Support.zoom.us/hc/en-us/articles/201362153-Sharing-Your_screen

HOW CAN I DEMONSTRATE A TECHNIQUE REMOTELY?

Our lesson plan downloads feature step by step photographs (where necessary) so your students will be able to see how the project progresses. You can share these photos with your students using one of the above options.

Our guided drawing lessons are also perfect for sharing.

WHERE CAN I START?

Having your students make a sketchbook is a nice way to ease into the school year. We have tips and ideas on how sketchbooks can be made for low cost, using supplies found in most homes.

These sketchbooks can be used quite successfully with our Sketchbook Starters. These are a terrific way for children to work on their art skills at home.

We also have 8 weeks of daily creative challenges that can be completed at home.

From there, you can choose lessons based on artists/art periods or themes. Or, visit our Get Started Bundle page.

HELPFUL DOWNLOADS

Click on the images below for helpful downloads and ideas.

ART ON A CART

I’ve never worked from a cart, but I did spend a number of years teaching at different schools, and my car was like a cart! 

Get Organized

There is no question that it is difficult to stay organized when you are on the move, but it’s not impossible. 

My biggest problem was at the end of the day. I really had to force myself to sort everything after a long day of teaching so I would be ready again in the morning. If nothing else, I tried to make sure my art supplies were clean and sorted. And, I have to admit, during those years, I didn’t use washable paint palettes, instead I used paper plates and tossed them at the end of each session. It really cut down on extra work. 

Bins and Baskets

Small bins with lids were essential for me to keep supplies separate and I could stack them for easy access. 

Keep it Simple

I also tried to plan similar projects for all the classrooms I visited, so I could keep the supplies to a minimum and switch them out when necessary.

Paint Tips

If you are working with liquid tempera, using egg cartons or ice cube trays with mini muffin liners will really help to speed up the cleaning process. This works for plastic as well as cardboard egg cartons. Then, at the end of the day, you can throw away the muffin liners with leftover paint, but keep the egg cartons. It’s not ideal in terms of saving the environment, but it is helpful if you are really tight on time.

Club member Robyn has this advice:

“I’ve been teaching after school art for five years now and it is all from a cart. I learned really quickly to have all the stuff I use regularly each lesson (pencils, erasers, copy paper, scissors, glue, etc) in stackable small containers (I use old VHS video boxes). These are easily accessed each lesson. I keep them in their containers – just open them up – so that the kids can access and more importantly, can return them to their right containers at the end of the class.

I teach from K to 6 in one group so where possible, I teach the same concept and just differ the project to suit the age group. This cuts down on prep time. For example, a watercolor project means I only need to bring the trays of watercolor paints and paintbrushes, water containers and paper towels. The paint trays are quickly wiped out at the end of each class and re-stacked in the cart ready for next lesson.

At the end of the week, I do a proper tidy up. A good habit, take five minutes at the end of the class to pack everything away neatly so you can switch off, knowing you’re all ready for the next class.

I also discovered when working with acrylic or tempera/poster paint, that using pieces of parchment paper as paint palettes makes for super easy clean up – fold in half and throw away.”

TEACHING IN A CLASSROOM

If you are teaching in a classroom, your time may be limited. For this reason, you might need to split your lessons into two sessions, especially when working with paint that needs to dry in between steps.

I also highly recommend using messy mats in the art room.

Messy mats will save your sanity in the art room. We use them A LOT in The KinderArt Club.

I started using these quite by accident, years ago while teaching painting in a room with no sink. I had forgotten to bring newspapers to protect the tables, but had extra sheets of poster paper on hand.

Initially I used them to protect the tables from paint drips, marker stains and oil pastel smears, but then I discovered that some of the kids were using them to clean their brushes in between colors, instead of dipping into their water containers!

Mind. Blown.

Now I use them all the time and I especially love them at home when working at the kitchen table with my daughter.

Here’s how they work:

🌟Place a sheet of 22″ x 30″ poster paper (the inexpensive kind they sell at dollar stores) on the table, underneath the artwork.

🌟Children wipe their brushes on the painting mat, before dipping into a new color.

🌟No need for the children to dip into water between each color, because we all know what too much water does to tempera paint! (Hello watery drips.)

When class is done the paper mats are gathered and stacked to be used another day.

TEACHING AT HOME OR IN A STUDIO

If you are teaching art at home or in a studio, you will likely have a small group of children.

Your time will not be as limited as the time available in a school with set schedules. Because of this extra time, you might even be able to use different materials. For example, if a lesson plan calls for tempera paint, you might want to use acrylic paint instead. And rather than paper, you might try canvas.

At home, you are probably working at a kitchen or dining room table, which means keeping things tidy will be a concern. But don’t be afraid! Simply plan ahead and use table cloths or table coverings in case of spills.

HELPFUL DOWNLOADS

Click on the images below to read/download helpful guides to help you plan and teach.